A furious woman posted this image on Twitter after having purchased a jumpsuit from ASOS, with period stain in the crotch. Picture: Twitter
A furious woman posted this image on Twitter after having purchased a jumpsuit from ASOS, with period stain in the crotch. Picture: Twitter

Woman’s ’sick’ discovery on ASOS item

Online shopping comes with its pros and cons.

Unfortunately, this woman's experience falls into the latter category.

When Roxy Williams, 36, from Cheltenham, in the UK, tried on her "new" jumpsuit, she discovered a very "sick" problem.

Ms Williams has blasted popular clothing site ASOS after spotting period blood in the crotch of her garment.

She posted an image of the grim find to her 3000 Twitter followers alongside a scathing rant.

"I know some people wash new clothes before they wear them, but you shouldn't HAVE to wash them first, unlike this supposedly "brand new" jumpsuit I bought on

@ASOS," she wrote, adding: "Yes, this is SOMEONE ELSE'S PERIOD BLOOD. And it's handwash only."

Ms Williams' horrifying find on the £40 ($A77) sale item left social media users equally as disgusted.

"Sweet baby Jesus … dirty b**ches," one user commented, while others shared "vomitting" gifs.

 

A furious woman posted this image on Twitter after buying a jumpsuit from ASOS with period stain in the crotch.
A furious woman posted this image on Twitter after buying a jumpsuit from ASOS with period stain in the crotch.

The shopper said she had put on the flower-patterned jumpsuit on Tuesday with the intention of wearing it to work that day.

"It's backless, so I took it off to put another layer on underneath. It was only when it laid inside out that I saw the bloodstains," she told The Sun.

"For a second I thought I must've started my period early (I hadn't) but on closer inspection it was very obviously someone else's dried period blood."

She said that after realising it wasn't her period - the discovery made her feel "physically sick".

"So, so gutted. Really shouldn't have to check for stains on a brand new item," she later wrote on Twitter.
After tagging ASOS in her original tweet, the brand responded several times asking her to direct message with all the details "and we'll be happy to help".

 

 

However, according to the shopper, they were a "string of automated direct messages with conflicting information", making contacting the company difficult.

She later told The Sun that in a private Twitter conversation, ASOS reassured her it would refund the money.

On Twitter, she updated her followers to say if it wasn't it in her account within 14 days she would call Trading Standards.

 

 

 

 

Last year, an Aussie was shamed for admitting she had been wearing and returning $300 dresses for nine years.

Mum-of-two Chelsea, from New South Wales, said she had worn and returned about 15 special-occasion frocks all ranging in price from $150 to more than $300 - because she didn't want to wear the same outfit twice.

She claimed the key to returning a garment without getting busted was keeping it clean - and definitely don't wash it. She makes sure she tucks any tags into the outfit but will remove them if visible - and simply claim they broke off when she tried the garment on.

 

 

However, people didn't take lightly to her tactic branding her as "revolting".

According to research from online deals website Finder, one in eight shoppers buy clothes with the intention of wearing then returning them - with "cash-strapped Millennials" being Australia's biggest offenders.

News.com.au has contacted ASOS for comment.


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