Sustainable clothing a 2017 trend

Items from Yevu Clothing's November 2016 release.
Items from Yevu Clothing's November 2016 release. Yevu Clothing

FAST fashion makes a new t-shirt about as expensive as a decent meal. While that's good for the wallet, it's not quite as good for the people making our clothes. A major trend set to be big in 2017 is about fashion production rather than the fashion itself.

Brands across the world are gaining a name for producing eye-catching clothing through sustainable practices in countries such as Ghana and Columbia.

Their products are often handcrafted using old techniques and are perfect for a fashion fan who wants to feel good about what they are wearing.

Mamahuhu is a collective of independent shoemakers in Colombia whose brightly coloured leather boots, belts and bags are all handmade.

It launched in 2010 after seeking out cobblers and shoe repairers across the country. Mamahuhu's workshops also use leather produced in Colombia.

Look out for their unusual design choices, especially when it comes to their boots. The shades of leather range from a coral and blue combination, to a delicate gold and right to a green shade dubbed Irish Clover. They'll set you back from about $120 Australian dollars a pair.

Yevu Clothing (pictured) is a similar social enterprise in Ghana and its printed dresses, skirts and shirts are made and designed by local seamstresses and tailors.

The brand has been around since 2013 and uses traditional wax print and handmade textiles and all their clothing is made to get attention.

One of its prints is a charming pattern of giant prawns set against a bright pink background.

Yevu's latest range was launched in November and offers the same print in different forms to match a shirt with a wrap skirt.

Their ladies' clothes start from $120 and accessories start from $40.

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Topics:  fashion new-year-new-you trend

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