Seven-hour walk needed to lose bunny

BUNDABERG people looking to work off a regular chocolate Easter bunny with a walk around the block could be in for a shock.

"One regular size 250g chocolate bunny will take an average middle-aged man around seven hours to walk off, while an average woman will need a staggering nine hours," Diabetes Queensland CEO Michelle Trute said.

"Easter eggs might seem like a harmless treat and they can be, as long as they are enjoyed in moderation."

The Queensland Swap It partnership - including Diabetes Queensland, Cancer Council Queensland and Nutrition Australia - has called for people to use the Easter long weekend to swap sitting for some outdoor fun.

"One way you can have your cake - at least a little bit of it - and eat it too is by swapping sitting for getting active," Ms Trute said.

"This Easter, why not take advantage of the long weekend and head to the beach for a swim?

"If you've got a dog, why not take it to the park for a walk?

"We have wonderful national parks in Queensland and the Easter break is the perfect time to swap the city for the country and get out and explore.

"There are plenty of operators who can arrange kayaking trips on our wonderful creeks and rivers."

Ms Trute said there were options for people who didn't feel up to the lengthy exercise required to work off Easter treats.

"If you don't feel your body is up to extensive exercise, why not try swapping milk chocolate for dark?" Ms Trute said.

"Dark chocolate is much richer and this means people often eat much less."


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