VISITING: Tim Ross is an Australian comedian, radio host and television presenter, best known for performing stand-up comedy and radio works as part of the comedy duo Merrick and Rosso with Merrick Watts.
VISITING: Tim Ross is an Australian comedian, radio host and television presenter, best known for performing stand-up comedy and radio works as part of the comedy duo Merrick and Rosso with Merrick Watts. CONTRIBUTED

Rosso's teak talk, sofa so good about furniture

COMEDIAN Tim 'Rosso' Ross' first ever live show in Byron Bay is called How Much For the Green Chair With Wooden Legs?

He has been performing the show at retail spaces, namely furniture shops, around the country.

The show draws from his latest book, The Rumpus Room, a collection of stories about his obsession with collecting furniture and Australian architecture.

It is also surprising that besides the gig, Rosso is also looking forward to his Byron Bay tradition.

"We head to Byron at least twice a year and, although I'm looking forward to doing the show on this trip, I'm more excited about my holiday tradition of the curried chicken pies from the Suffolk Bakery," he said.

Speaking from Melbourne, on his way to Hobart, Rosso said he likes to offers hows in retail spaces.

"I like those different spaces, you get to check out some furniture and you always get a good seat, literally," he said.

"I get to meet a lot of like minded, interested people."

Rosso said it's easy to see a distinctive style of architecture, furniture and design in the Byron Shire.

"Obviously is very earth-based, and timber has traditionally been part of house in Byron Bay," he said.

"There is also a lot of re-invention of tin sheds.

"But the main look is the use of lots of timber that is open to the elements, in a style that has embraced the outdoors and the bush.

"That also includes lots of fans, shade and natural ventilation.

"In more recent times, there's been a bad Hampton Style that has been adopted, particularly in commercial accommodation, but to me that has nothing to do with Byron, it's just generic and it's a terrible throwback to when we used to call things 'The Acapulco Motel'."

"It's all that rubbish, and there is a bit of that going on, and that becomes synonymous with Byron.

"For some people the timber and earthy materials from Byron Bay is outdated, but that doesn't mean it's not good.

"I think the idea of a slightly outdated Byron Bay style of architecture and design is better than this Hampton style pastiche," he said.

Tim Ross acknowledged the influence hippie culture had in true Byron Bay style.

"Absolutely. You see it across the board with colours, in terms of materials, home-made furniture, decoration, the use of pottery and sculptures," he said.

The comedian said his show is also a good gig for those who are not interested in furniture or architecture.

"As a stand up comedian I tell stories, and most people tend to find something that is relatable about them," he said.

"The idea of talking about architecture and furniture is a hook for me to hang things off."

For Tim Ross, a lot of a piece of furniture's value comes from the memories we hold that surround such a piece.

"If you buy a good piece of furniture, it becomes your family heirloom, but if you inherit it, you can get a sense of where it came from and I like that personally, I like history and the stories that furniture can tell."


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