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Beach-goers make the most of the rising king tide

Three year old Rory Doherty from the Gold Coast and six year old Xavier Prescott from Perth make the most of the high tide at Lennox Head.
Three year old Rory Doherty from the Gold Coast and six year old Xavier Prescott from Perth make the most of the high tide at Lennox Head. Cathy Adams

PEAKING at 1.9m high, yesterday's king tides brought a wave of fun for beachgoers who made the most of the biannual event.

All the way from WA, Lennox Head holiday-makers Ashley and Kate Prescott said the king tide was a good opportunity to get their children Xavier, six, and Will, four, comfortable in the surf.

"It's good to encourage the kids to come at high tide and get them used to the waves," Ms Prescott said.

She said the waters of the West Coast were a lot flatter than those on the East Coast.

"It's a lot calmer there and you don't get the variety."

For Mr Prescott, king tides are a good time to cast the line.

"It brings the fish closer to the shore and the water becomes a lot deeper so the bigger fish come."

He said a big high tide also meant a shallow low-tide, allowing fishermen to get onto the outer reef.

As well as riding waves, and catching fish, the high tide also brings with it an abundance of "interesting things" to find on the sand.

For Xavier and Will, this was everything from crabs and shells to dead birds and cuttlefish.

But their favourite part was "how the waves carried us away."

Although the 10am high tide was fun for some beachgoers, surfers Flynn Morcombe and Brittany Hoey from Newcastle, were left slightly disappointed by the conditions.

"It's windy and on-shore," Ms Hoey said. "Back at home it's supposed to be really good (because of the king tide), but not here."

She said in Lennox Head, the king tide didn't seem to have affected the size of the surf, which had been relatively small all week.

Green Cross Australia is asking coastal communities across the country to photograph king tides as part of the Witness King Tides project.

The project aims to capture what coastal communities may look like in the future, as global sea levels rise.

Since 2012, over 4400 photos have been uploaded.

A car hits the King tide in Ballina on Thursday in Tamar street, Ballina.
A car hits the King tide in Ballina on Thursday in Tamar street, Ballina. Doug Eaton

Topics:  king tide


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