Mobile speed camera warning signs which make drivers aware that they are approaching a camera vehicle have ceased to be used in NSW. Supplied
Mobile speed camera warning signs which make drivers aware that they are approaching a camera vehicle have ceased to be used in NSW. Supplied

'SNEAKY': Removing speed camera signs is 'revenue raising'

More people are getting caught by speed cameras since warning signs were removed.

The Daily Telegraph reported last month almost nine times more people were fined for speeding in January this year compared with the same month in 2020.

In January 2021, more than $3.4 million in fines were issued from mobile speed cameras, compared with almost $382,000 in fines issued for the same month in 2020.

We asked our readers whether the NSW Government was right in removing the warning signs from mobile speed cameras.

>>>Nine times more speeding fines as warnings removed

And the responses were mixed.

Those in favour said people who are abiding by the law and not speeding shouldn't have an issue with the lack of signage.

•James Bentley: "What's the point in having a Speed Camera out to fine people for doing the wrong thing if you're going to warn them about it? If you aren't ok with them removing the warning signs for cameras then it just means that you're annoyed about the fact you're going to get caught more often doing the wrong thing.

•Kylie Pirlo: "Yes. You shouldn't need to be warned not to speed. You just shouldn't be speeding! Besides, I've seen people slow down once they see the warning, get past the camera, then speed up again."

 

Mobile speed camera warning sign displaying speed limit
Mobile speed camera warning sign displaying speed limit

 

But there were many people who argued removing the signs was just a ploy to raise revenue.

•Ursula Bentley: "They were set up for safety, now if you can't identify them, they can only be revenue raising. No safety involved."

•Lucia Zorzi: "If they were serious about reducing the road toll then there would be more high profile and active policing. This is purely about revenue raising and not about saving lives."

•Jacquie Estreich: "No it's not what they were designed to do it's not making people aware or deter people from speeding it's a sneaky negative way to make money."

•Lenore Dignam: "If you are driving in a place you are not familiar with it can be easy to be going the wrong speed. The warning signs meant you knew the speed zone you were in and there was no excuse if you got caught. Maybe the warning signs should still be in play so people are sure of the zone they are in but keep the cars unmarked. They could ditch the your speed has been checked sign after the zone too."

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But for one reader, Heather Marsh, she's said she's not opposed to the lack of signs because it's made her a better driver.

"It's made me a more 'observant of the speed limit' driver (which is) probably a good thing," Ms Marsh said.


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