Ronnie the red cattle dog-kelpie cross is one of the first pets to be enrolled in a free weight-loss clinic at the Maroochydore Veterinary Surgery.
Ronnie the red cattle dog-kelpie cross is one of the first pets to be enrolled in a free weight-loss clinic at the Maroochydore Veterinary Surgery. Brett Wortman

Pets score weight-loss sessions

PUT down the Whiskers and the Chum, it’s not just the human population fighting the battle of the bulge.

Poor diet and a lack of exercise have overweight and obese dogs and cats facing the same health-related problems as their human counterparts.

Maroochydore Veterinary Surgery on Maud St has jumped to their aid, offering a free weight-loss clinic for fat furry friends. “Being overweight can cause a lot of health problems for our pets,” veterinary nurse Amy Taylor said.

According to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention, the primary risks of excess weight in pets are osteoarthritis, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart and respiratory disease, cranial cruciate ligament injury, kidney disease, many forms of cancer and decreased life expectancy (up to 2.5 years).

One of Ms Taylor’s clients, seven-year-old red cattle dog-kelpie cross Ronnie, came in for his first session yesterday.

He tipped the scales at 44.3kg.

Ms Taylor said they would aim to reduce his weight to 30 to 35kg over the coming weeks and months.

“It’s going to be a mission,” she said.

“For a dog what we’re after is an hourglass shape when you’re looking down over their body.”

Consultations either weekly or fortnightly will document the pets’ body weight and weight measurement.

The weight-loss clinics run Mondays and Tuesdays, and take 15 to 30 minutes.

To sign up, call 5443 1330.

 

SOME PET FACTS

  • 44% of dogs are overweight
  • 40% of cats are overweight
  • Dogs more likely to have weight control problems than cats
  • Animals at greatest risk are female, neutered, older, poorly exercised animals with obese owners
  • Only 5% of cases are treated medically; 95% must be treated through control of calorie intake

Source: RSPCA

 

Fat Pet

  • 44% of dogs are overweight
  • 40% of cats are overweight.
  • Dogs are more likely to encounter weight control problems than cats.
  • Animals at greater risk are female, neutered, older, poorly exercised, animals with obese owners, “only” pets.
  • Only 5% of cases are treated medically, 95% of cases must be treated through control of caloric intake.

Source: RSPCA


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