"THIS has been an extraordinary odyssey for everyone."

With those words a jubilant Peter Greste thanked his parents, brothers and friends from around the world for their relentless campaign to have him freed from an Egyptian jail.

Mr Greste, speaking in front of the cameras in Brisbane just after 10am, said he was still coming to terms with the extent of the campaign to free him.

A massive media scrum surrounds freed journalist Peter Greste at his Brisbane press conference on February 5.
A massive media scrum surrounds freed journalist Peter Greste at his Brisbane press conference on February 5. David Stuart

 

He thanked diplomats and politicians, including Foreign Minister Julie Bishop and ambassador in Egypt, Dr Ralph King.

He said he did not want to give his job up as a correspondent, urging his parents to block their ears as he said that.

But his mum said: "He has got to know we are not going to go through this again.''

Mr Greste said he was in good health in mind and body.

He said he had not been subjected to any abuse in jail with authorities treating him well.

Mr Greste thanked the media for pulling together and joining the campaign for his freedom.

"It feels really weird to be on this side of the microphone,'' he admitted.

"What we have seen out of this experience is a sense of unity, a sense of purpose.''

"I am only just beginning to understand the extent of the campaign.

He said the campaign would not have got the momentum it had without the "incredible contribution of my parents and my brothers".

More to come

 

Peter Greste returns to Australia after 400 days in jail

Peter Greste poses for photographers outside Brisbane International Airport.
Peter Greste poses for photographers outside Brisbane International Airport. David Stuart

FLASHING the victory sign with his fingers, Peter Greste walked from Brisbane International Airport a free man after spending 400 days in an Egyptian prison.

Greeted by family, well-wishers and a large media contingent, the Al Jazeera journalist emerged from the immigration doors to hearty cheers.

"It feels absolutely awesome to be here with my family," he said.

"But of course this is all tempered, I'm going to say this a million times, this is tempered by a real worry for my colleagues.

"For all of the other guys that were imprisoned alongside us."

 


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