Left to right, Cedar Anderson & Stuart Anderson, the father-and-son inventing duo from the Northern Rivers that invited the Flow Hive.
Left to right, Cedar Anderson & Stuart Anderson, the father-and-son inventing duo from the Northern Rivers that invited the Flow Hive.

It’s official, Flow Hive honey tastes the best

IT'S been five years and Flow Hive honey has never tasted so good according to a new study by the University of Queensland.

The two monofloral honeys harvested using the Flow Frame system had significantly higher floral and cleaner aftertaste sensory scores than the honey extracted using commercial methods that involve the use of heat and centrifugation.

The UQ scientists took two honeys, harvested three different ways, and performed taste tests.

Now as the Flow Hive team celebrates five years of steady work since their record-breaking launch in 2015, it was all eyes forward on the next Flow Hive project.

Flow Hive's co-inventor, Cedar Anderson said the biggest lesson in the five years was learning how to grow an effective and dynamic team to support product innovation and growth.

"We had to grow a team extremely quickly," Mr Anderson said.

"The people that you work with is one of the most important things and it is something that for me was a big learning curve, but having an amazing team is one of the most important things and we were so lucky to have that come our way overnight," he said.

"We could never have achieved what we have achieved without all of the amazing friends and family that just jumped on board."

He said after the process of creativity, where you create the product, the next major hurdle was problem solving and working out the best fit for manufacturing, distribution and marketing.

"It's hard to believe it has only been five years," he said of the rapid growth of the company.

"At the same time there is a whirlwind of memories and all of the intensity that comes with that and it was extremely exciting but extremely stressful time as well."

But the Flow Hive revolution has stretched their vision beyond just the groundbreaking product and honey.

In 2015 they raised $97,300 for Oxfam Australia in the wake of the destructive cyclone that hit Vanuatu.

And in 2019 they joined the NetZero 2030 movement where more than 500 companies around the world committed to reducing their greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero by 2030.

Their fundraising projects raised over $260,000 for disaster relief, they repurposed their Flow Hive timber offcuts by designing beautiful little pollinator houses to help support native solitary nesting bees, became a certified B Corporation for sustainability and will be donating 50 per cent of profits from the new TheBeeKeeper.org project to support pollinators.

"The way we view it is each hive that we post out is like a window for new beekeepers into the natural world we all depend on," Mr Anderson said.

"That's because new beekeepers really start to tune in on what's flowering, and who's spraying what and all the biodiversity which keeps the whole system going.

"In a way every hive that we send out is helping that process of humans connecting back to nature which we all depend on."


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