International airports hit by computer system crash

PLANE passengers at a more than 100 international airports are suffering major disruptions after computer check-in systems crashed.

There are reported problems at airports including London's Gatwick, Charles de Gaulle in Paris, Changi in Singapore, Johannesburg, Zurich, New York, South Korea, South Africa, Melbourne, Sydney and Canberra in Australia, as well as Washington DC's Reagan Airport.

Passengers have been enduring long waits at check-in desks for flights on British Airways, Air France, KLM, Qantas, Lufthansa and Southwest airlines.

In Melbourne, travellers tweeted that there were problems for those with flights booked at Qatar Airways and Qantas.

Melbourne Airport has tweeted that check-in is now proceeding.

The problem is affecting Amadeus Altea check-in software, The Telegraph UK reports.

It is used by 125 airlines, both at airports and online.

Heathrow Airport has confirmed that airlines at terminals 2, 3 and 4 have been experiencing systems problems.

"A small number of airlines are currently experiencing intermittent issues with their check-in systems at airports around the world - including at Heathrow," a spokeswoman said.

"Passengers will still be able to check-in for their flight, although the process may take slightly longer than usual.

"We are working closely with our airlines to help resolve the issue as quickly as possible. We apologise for any inconvenience this may cause."

Gatwick said the situation as a "momentary IT glitch" and said it was not causing flight delays, and the system was back up and running.

According to The Mirror in London, IT firm Amadeus, the software's creator, said: "Amadeus confirms that during the morning, we experienced a network issue that caused disruption to some of our systems. As a result of the incident, customers experienced disruption to certain services.

"Amadeus technical teams took immediate action to identify the cause of the issue and restore services as quickly as possible. That action is ongoing with services gradually being restored. Amadeus regrets any inconvenience caused to customers."

Some airlines reported that they were affected by the glitch for a matter of minutes, though it was more than three hours before Amadeus was able to say that the network was "functioning normally."

It declined to comment on whether hackers was behind the problem.

Originally published as World airport system crash sparks chaos

News Corp Australia

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