Cancer Council CEO Chris McMillan said occasionally some types of HPV persist in the body and if left untreated, can become cancerous.
Cancer Council CEO Chris McMillan said occasionally some types of HPV persist in the body and if left untreated, can become cancerous.

HPV leads to cervical cancer risk

TODAY is Human PapillomaVirus (HPV) Awareness Day and women are being urged to learn about the associated risks.

Cancer Council Queensland CEO Chris McMillan said most cases of cervical cancer are caused by the infection.

"Four out of five people will experience HPV at some stage of their lives, with the virus affecting both males and females," Ms McMillan said.

"Occasionally some types of HPV persist in the body and if left untreated, can become cancerous.

"With major research breakthroughs bringing preventable measures such as the HPV vaccination and cervical screening test, (we) encourage women to be proactive about their health to ensure their best chance of survival of cervical cancer."

Ms McMillan said while the infection is harmless for most people, women with HPV that are exposed to tobacco smoke are also more susceptible to developing cervical cancer.

For more information, phone 13 11 20 or visit cancer.org.au/cervicalscreening.


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