COASTAL rain and associated thunderstorms will be the main feature of Northern Rivers weather today and tomorrow, according to the Bureau of Meteorology.

Meteorologist Helen Reid said the current wet weather recorded in coastal areas of Northern NSW will linger until tomorrow.

"We are under the influence of a high pressure ridge over the eastern part of NSW, and that is producing an onshore flow for the Northern Rivers," she said.

"With that, there is some shower activity, offshore there is some thunder activity as well, adding to the excitement over the water.

"This will be a couple of, what we call, stream showers though the day, and that will probably be clearing out over the course of tomorrow.

"Around Cape Byron and Ballina there is a convergence, the winds are coming together, and becoming a bit more of a focal point for showers."

 

The BOM meteorologist said she did not expect large amounts in the rain gauge in the area, but on-and-off showers for the next 24 hours.

"The showers are not going very far inland, most of the shower activity is really coastal," she said.

"Only few, if any showers would be reaching into Lismore or Kyogle, it's pretty much a coastal system.

The meteorologist said after tomorrow brings an end to the rain, the Northern Rivers will see another cold front on Sunday.

"The next big system we expect to move right across the state and then affect the far north east would not really get through until Sunday," she said.

"A cold front will be moving in then."


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