Byron Bay photographer Craig Parry is reaching new levels with his work after scoring a gig with National Geographic.
Byron Bay photographer Craig Parry is reaching new levels with his work after scoring a gig with National Geographic.

How local photographer came to work with National Geographic

NATIONAL Geographic has long been held in high regard for its story telling and ability to transport readers to magical far off landscapes and wildlife habitats, cities and modern science marvels.

Making one Byron Bay based photographer's dreams come true, the prestigious company set sights on Craig Parry.

As a young child taking photos with a Kodak underwater camera gifted by his parents, Mr Parry believed working with National Geographic seemed a fantastical dream, but in many ways it was what helped spur his incredible career into wildlife photography.

"As a child I dreamt of going on expeditions and creating story telling with my photos," Mr Parry said.

Now this lofty ideal has become a reality.

Migaloo beneath the surface. Picture: Craig Parry
Migaloo beneath the surface. Picture: Craig Parry

"A talent scout got in contact with me, and they wanted me to send over a portfolio.

"They became interested after receiving photos from the first part of a production I was assisting on in South Australia, and once I sent through the photos from both campaigns, they suddenly wanted to know who I was and where I lived," he said.

This led to a dream shot working on a new documentary with National Geographic as the head of production for photography.

Disaster then struck as the untimely arrival of coronavirus unravelled across the globe, postponing work and grounding all flights.

"This was a big thing for me as this was my first real position with National Geographic and it is a huge milestone in my career," he said.

"It is disappointing to postpone but obviously health is more important than the risk."

Mr Parry said while the virus came as a shock, he was grateful he had scaled back some of his tours to make room for National Geographic work and was ultimately just waiting to see what would happen with the Tongan Whale tours in September.

He said would use this time to finally go through thousands of photos and would continue work on a new book on Byron Bay that was in production.


Horrifying prediction of visitor economy’s COVID-19 plunge

premium_icon Horrifying prediction of visitor economy’s COVID-19 plunge

HOLIDAYS in regional areas are off the cards and the region’s economy will be hit...

The only 16 excuses for going out

The only 16 excuses for going out

Coronavirus Australia: 16 reasonable excuses for going out in NSW

Sources of infection recorded as coronavirus tally rises

premium_icon Sources of infection recorded as coronavirus tally rises

More coronavirus cases confirmed in Northern NSW LHD