JUDGE: Byron Bay butcher Graeme Mead at work at Byron Bay.
JUDGE: Byron Bay butcher Graeme Mead at work at Byron Bay. Gary Chigwidden

Graeme snags it

BEING a sausage judge for the Sydney Royal Easter Show can have its benefits – especially if you are hungry.

Generally, judges taste a sample of sausage and spit it out.

But Byron Bay butcher Graeme Mead missed breakfast on the first day of judging at the Sydney Showground at Homebush recently and admits to happily eating a fair number of the 70 sausage samples he judged.

A first-time judge at the show, Graeme is following in the footsteps of his dad Trevor, who has judged at the show several times.

Starting his apprenticeship with Trevor at 15, he has made thousands of snags since and is always keen to try new recipes.

There are about a dozen varieties in the display cabinet of the Jonson Street store which has been a Byron Bay institution for more than 20 years.

Sausages Graeme judged in Sydney included traditional beef and a big range of specialty snags including Spanish blood sausages, traditional Irish pork sausages and Greek lamb sausages.

He said the first test of a good snag was its look – raw and cooked. Then came uniformity of size, texture, workmanship, aroma and, finally, taste.

He said he enjoyed his first experience as a judge and would do it again if invited.


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