Bubbles the koala is released back into the wild on Tuesday by wildlife carer Paula Rowlands on their property at Glastonbury.
Bubbles the koala is released back into the wild on Tuesday by wildlife carer Paula Rowlands on their property at Glastonbury. Tanya Easterby

Couple releases Bubbles the koala

ANOTHER precious koala has experienced the blessing of Paula and David Rowlands.

The Rowlands of Australian Native Animal Rescue Rehabilitation Association have saved many lives and Bubbles is the latest to get a lucky break.

She was only a baby when she was found in the middle of the road in October 2012.

She was completely ignored by motorists who drove around her before a call was made.

President of Australian Native Animal Rescue Rehabilitation Association Paula Rowlands said the koala was badly injured and only weighed 500 grams when she first captured their hearts.

"She was so easy to raise," she said.

"She was called Bubbles because we raised her in the bathroom."

"We are very attached, but you know you have to let them go."

 

Now two years old and fully recovered, Bubbles is ready to join other koalas in the bush.

"We sent her to Australia Zoo for a few months," Mrs Rowlands said.

"It was there she gained the balance and skills she needs to survive."

The property is constantly inundated with sick or injured koalas.

"They have so many diseases."

"They have no hope at all, especially with the amount of trees that are being destroyed."

For more than 30 years the Rowlands have been rehabilitating wildlife at their private animal hospital on their Glastonbury property.

However they are in desperate need of some support.

"We really do need more volunteers and donations."

"We receive no help from the government."

Mr Rowlands said people needed to be more aware of the harm animals suffer.

"Humans are the biggest killer of koalas and other wildlife," he said.

"If we work to save koala habitats, we save many habitats."

These creatures face many threats including a loss of habitat or injury and death from cats, dogs, and traffic.

If you find any animal in distress ensure you call a wildlife carer.

WHO TO CALL

Australian Native Animal Rescue Rehabilitation Association Inc 5484 9111.

Operated by Paula and David Rowlands.

They service the Wide Bay and South Burnett region.

Call to volunteer or make a donation.

If you find an animal in distress ensure you call this number.

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