CHOP CHOP: Lawrence Clain at the Le Chop stall at the Mullumbimby Farmers Market.
CHOP CHOP: Lawrence Clain at the Le Chop stall at the Mullumbimby Farmers Market. Kate O'Neill

Chairman of the chopping boards

CAMPHOR laurel may be recognised as a weed on the Northern Rivers, but the timber from these trees is a woodworker's dream, says Lawrence Clain.

"As a timber it's quite amazing. It's not as hard as a hardwood and not as soft as say, pine, so it makes it really nice to work with. And every piece has such unique colours and patterns in it,” he said.

The timber also contains oils that are anti-bacterial, which makes it the perfect choice for the chopping boards Lawrence makes and sells at the Le Chop stall at the Mullumbimby Farmers market each week. The boards vary in size from tiny right up to big boards you could serve an entire roast dinner on.

"A lot of the mass-produced boards, because of the way they are joined they can fall apart a lot easier, whereas ours are all one piece except for the handles, which we glue, screw and plug.”

A Le Chop board will last more than 20 years, according to Lawrence: "And even then you can sand it back, re-oil and they come back new,” he said.

"The antibacterial properties also stay in the board. It doesn't matter how many times you wash it, they're still in there.”

Find Le Chop at the Mullumbimby Farmers Market every Friday.


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