Wategoat, the last of the goat herd that lived on Cape Byron's, has not been seen for six weeks and authorities believe she may have died.
Wategoat, the last of the goat herd that lived on Cape Byron's, has not been seen for six weeks and authorities believe she may have died. Guy Hastings

Cape Byron’s Wategoat missing, presumed dead

BYRON Bay's iconic fugitive female goat has gone missing, presumed dead.

It's been six weeks since national park rangers spotted Wategoat on their daily rounds, said Lawrence Orel from National Parks and Wildlife Services.

"It's certainly one of the longest periods the animal hasn't been seen," he said.

The tenacious cliff-dweller, who made headlines in April after evading an effort to remove her, has now been all but written off.

Mr Orel said veterinarians involved in April's capture attempt had identified the goat as well into her twilight years.

"The advice from the experts is the animal was quite elderly," he said

"It is possible it's reached the end of its life."

The solitary goat has confounded expectations of its imminent demise before.

It was considered potentially ill and injured in April but managed to race away from its roped-up would-be rescuers then as soon as they got close.

But if the speculation is true, the goat will live on in Byron's collective memory. Byron mayor Simon Richardson announced in June that an exhibition space at the Byron Library would be named The Lone Goat Gallery.


Byron bounces back

Byron bounces back

Byron back on top.

Local surfer rides into milestone season of My Kitchen Rules

Local surfer rides into milestone season of My Kitchen Rules

ASH 'the friendly pirate' Keillah swaps his board for an apron.

Masterplan update on agenda

Masterplan update on agenda

Masterplan Guidance Group eyes next project.

Local Partners