Boris Johnson Election Night
Boris Johnson Election Night

Boris Johnson reacts to stunning victory

Behind the scenes snaps of Boris Johnson on election night show the hugs, cheers and beers of the Tories' incredible win.

The PM is shown leaping into the air next to a jubilant Carrie Symonds at No10 and beaming as he enjoys a group hug with Michael Gove and Sajid Javid at Tory HQ, The Sun reports.

In other pictures he throws his hands aloft next to a framed painting of Margaret Thatcher and calmly strokes Ms Symonds' terrier Dilyn as he watches the action unfold on TV.

 

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his partner Carrie Symonds watch the election results on the TV in his study. Picture: Andrew Parsons / i-Images
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his partner Carrie Symonds watch the election results on the TV in his study. Picture: Andrew Parsons / i-Images

Boris is also snapped celebrating with all of his staff at Tory HQ as he throws up two thumbs up and bellows a cheer into the camera.

The PM bulldozed the red wall - traditionally Labour seats in the party's northern heartlands - to secure an 80-seat majority.

He left Jeremy Corbyn crushed and forced to resign as Labour boss after taking the party to the worst result in 40 years.

Speaking on Friday morning, an ecstatic Mr Johnson said his "stonking" win has given him a "powerful mandate to get Brexit done".

 

 

GETTING BREXIT DONE

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson will "get Brexit done" by January 31 then agree a new trade deal with the European Union by the end of 2020, cabinet office minister Michael Gove says.

Johnson and his team were triumphant last week when he won a commanding majority of 80 at an early election he said he was forced to call to break the Brexit deadlock.

Winning over many traditionally Labour voters in northern and central England, Johnson has proclaimed he will lead a "people's government". First, the Conservative leader must make good on his often-repeated promise to "get Brexit done" and then turn to realising another priority - to increase funding into Britain's much loved but struggling public health service, a pledge he plans to enshrine in law.

"I can absolutely confirm that we will have an opportunity to vote on the Withdrawal Agreement Bill in relatively short order and then we will make sure that it passes before January 31st," Gove told Sky News.

 

Prime Minister Boris Johnson makes a statement in Downing Street after receiving permission to form the next government during an audience with Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace earlier today. Picture: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Prime Minister Boris Johnson makes a statement in Downing Street after receiving permission to form the next government during an audience with Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace earlier today. Picture: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

 

Asked about a new trade accord with the EU, Gove said: "It will be concluded next year. We will be in a position to leave the European Union before the 31st of January next year and then we will have concluded our conversations with the EU about the new framework of free trade and friendly co-operation that we will have with them by the end of next year." The EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, has cast doubt over whether the trade talks will be so swiftly concluded, saying last month that the negotiations would be "difficult and demanding" and warning Britain the bloc "will not tolerate unfair competitive advantage".

Johnson will set out his program on Thursday in a Queen's Speech. Rishi Sunak, a deputy finance minister, said the government aimed to resubmit the Withdrawal Agreement Bill to parliament for ratification before Christmas. Johnson faces a struggle to unite a country where disagreements over how, when or whether Britain should leave the EU have torn towns, villages and even families apart.

For the opposition Labour Party, Thursday's election was its worst result since 1935 and underlined how its equivocal Brexit policy and its socialist leader, Jeremy Corbyn, had proven an electoral disaster for many traditional supporters. "Let me make it clear that it's on me. Let's take it on the chin," Labour's finance chief John McDonnell told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show. "I own this disaster." He said there would be a new leader in place by early next year. Lisa Nandy, a politician for the northern town of Wigan, said she could enter the race, while justice policy chief Richard Burgon said he would back Rebecca Long- Bailey, Labour's business policy chief, if she decided to run for the leadership.

Corbyn, who apologised to Labour supporters in two newspapers on Sunday, has said he will step down as soon as a new leader has been elected by the party membership.

"I will make no bones about it. The result was a body blow for everyone who so desperately needs real change in our country ... I'm sorry that we came up short and I take my responsibility for it," he wrote.

But Corbyn added: "I remain proud of the campaign we fought ... And I'm proud that our message was one of hope, rather than fear."


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