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5 reasons why we are Loving Vincent in Byron Bay

A scene from the movie Loving Vincent, the first ever fully painted feature film. Supplied by Madman Films.
A scene from the movie Loving Vincent, the first ever fully painted feature film. Supplied by Madman Films.

HAILED as one of the most interesting cinematic projects of the decade, Loving Vincent is coming to Byron Bay Film festival 2017.

Although the final list of films selected has not been published yet, organisers confirmed the film will be screened in this year's selection recently via their Facebook page.

The feature film about the life and mysterious death of Dutch Post-Impressionist painter Vincent Van Gogh offers a visual experience unlike any other feature film: each frame has been painted by hand in the style of Van Gogh's painting.

Loving Vincent will be officially released in Australia on November 2.

Here are five reason why this most be one of the most interesting films to grace our screens this year:

1. 65,000 reason to watch it

Each of the film's 65,000 frames is an oil painting on 1000 canvases, using the same technique as Van Gogh, created by a team of 125 painters. This makes it the world's first fully painted animation feature.

A select few original oil paintings from the film are now on sale via http:/lovingvincent.com/

A scene from the movie Loving Vincent, the first ever fully painted feature film. Supplied by Madman Films.
A scene from the movie Loving Vincent, the first ever fully painted feature film. Supplied by Madman Films.

2. The new art-house

This film is set to re-define what art-house cinema looks like.

In only 94 minutes, the film re-invents Van Gogh's universe.

Van Gogh's painting were re-created as film sets or using CGI by cinematographers Lukasz Zal (Ida) and Tristan Oliver (Fantastic Mr Fox).

The Painting Design Team spent a whole year re-imagining Van Gogh's painting via the medium of film, with 94 painting featured in a form very close to the original and a further 31 that were featured "substantially or partially".

 

 A scene from the movie Loving Vincent, the first ever fully painted feature film. Supplied by Madman Films.
A scene from the movie Loving Vincent, the first ever fully painted feature film. Supplied by Madman Films.

 

3. The cast

Loving Vincent was first shot as a live action film with actors, and then hand-painted over frame-by-frame in oils.

The cast includes stars such as Saoirse Ronan (Oscan nominee for Brooklyn, Atonement) as Van Gogh's daughter Marguerite Gachet, Chris O'Dowd (The IT Crowd, Bridesmaids) as postman Joseph Roulin.

The film introduces theatre actor Robert Gulaczyk in his first cinema role as Vincen Van Gogh.

 

From left, actor Robert Gulaczyk as Van Gogh, a self portrait by the artist (centre), and the painted frame featured in Loving Vincent.
From left, actor Robert Gulaczyk as Van Gogh, a self portrait by the artist (centre), and the painted frame featured in Loving Vincent. CONTRIBUTED

 

From left, actor Chris O'Dowd as postman Joseph Roulin, Van Gogh's original painting of the postman (centre), and the painted frame featuring in Loving Vincent.
From left, actor Chris O'Dowd as postman Joseph Roulin, Van Gogh's original painting of the postman (centre), and the painted frame featuring in Loving Vincent. CONTRIBUTED

 

From left, actress Saoirse Ronan as Van Gogh's daughter Marguerite Gachet, Van Gogh's original painting (centre), and the frame transformed into a painting for Loving Vincent.
From left, actress Saoirse Ronan as Van Gogh's daughter Marguerite Gachet, Van Gogh's original painting (centre), and the frame transformed into a painting for Loving Vincent. CONTRIBUTED

 

4. The Polish female director and writer

There is nothing more refreshing and exciting in the world of cinema than diversity off and on camera.

Dorota Kobiela is a graduate from the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, Poland.

Kobiela was awarded the Minister of Culture scholarship for special achievements in painting and graphics for four consecutive years.

She attended The Warsaw Film School, Direction Faculty.

She has directed one live action short film, The Hart in Hand (2006) and five animated shorts - The Letter (2004), Love Me (2004), Mr. Bear (2005), Chopin's Drawings (2011) and Little Postman (2011).

Little Postman was the world's first, and to her knowledge still only, Stereoscopic Painting Animation film, and won Stereoscopic Best Short Film at the Los Angeles 3D Film Festival, 3D Stereo Media (Liege), 3D Film & Music Fest (Barcelona).

For her sixth animated short, Loving Vincent, Dorota aimed to combine her passion for painting and film, and intended to paint the entire film herself.

Once she expanded the project into a feature film, the task of writing and directing was such that she had to content herself with directing the 125 painters.

Loving Vincent is her feature film debut.

 

5. For the love of Vincent

 A scene from the movie Loving Vincent, the first ever fully painted feature film. Supplied by Madman Films.
A scene from the movie Loving Vincent, the first ever fully painted feature film. Supplied by Madman Films.

Asked why she dedicated seven years of her life to this project, Dorota Kobiela has said this film is a labour of love.

"My love of Vincent's work, his letters and my respect for his struggle sustained me through those 7 years," she said.

The film is also a reference to how he often signed off his letters to his brother: "Your loving Vincent".

But for Kobiela the most important reason is the number of people that loves and appreciates Van Gogh's work.

"I hope this film will inspire people to find out more about Vincent, read his letters, see his paintings in the flesh," she said.

"I hope I will have, in some small way, helped introduce Vincent to more people. I think he

deserved that. I want everyone to be Loving Vincent!"

The Byron Bay Film festival will be held at a number of different venues across the Northern Rivers from October 6 to 15. For details visit bbff.com.au.

Topics:  byron bay film festival 2017 cinema loving vincent vincent van gogh whatson


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