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Search on for film fest supporters

GOOD CROWD: The crowd filled the park beside Byron surf club to watch a movie outdoors at the Byron Bay Film Festival earlier this year.
GOOD CROWD: The crowd filled the park beside Byron surf club to watch a movie outdoors at the Byron Bay Film Festival earlier this year.

GROWING FESTIVAL: Director J'aimee Skippon-Volke. digby Hildreth

THE search is on for movie and festival buffs to back or help out at the 2013 Byron Bay Film Festival.

"We are looking for volunteers and any other kind of support," said J'aimee Skippon-Volke, the festival's director.

"We have a small budget compared to other festivals but we're hoping a business will sponsor us, or some patron of the arts will come forward."

The BBFF received a small amount in State Government funding but only to promote itself outside the immediate area, J'aimee said.

She said the festival was on its way to becoming a regional flagship event and the organisers saw it as growing every year.

"We screened at five venues last year - the most yet - and we hope to expand on that," J'aimee said.

"It will reach a point where potential sponsors will see they are in danger of missing the boat."

As a result of the goodwill of local volunteers, J'aimee said that despite the festival's small financial resource, she was always amazed at what was able to be achieved, year after year.

Organisers planned on repeating last year's successful outdoor screening of a major film near Main Beach one evening - perhaps as a prelude to the festival - creating a popular family event "with a distinctive Byron vibe".

Entries were still rolling in and the festival would maintain its focus of interest - environment, social justice and surfing, she said.

"We are unique among film festivals in that we include surf films. Their makers are very happy to have their work shown to mainstream audiences," she said.


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