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Historic moment for Saint Columba's at Ewingsdale

HISTORIC: George and Fae Flick with Hilary Kerr standing in front of St Columbas Church at Ewingsdale.
HISTORIC: George and Fae Flick with Hilary Kerr standing in front of St Columbas Church at Ewingsdale. Christian Morrow

THE founding of St Columba's Church, an important link with Byron Bay's past, will be celebrated at a special service this Sunday, August 3, at the church on William Flick La in Ewingsdale.

The foundation stone was laid on August 1, 1914, with the church consecrated on March 1, 1915.

Local man George Flick has been the church warden at St Columba's for the past 50 years, and his grandfather, William Flick, was the instigator of bringing the church to the area.

George's wife Fae Flick is also part of the team that maintains the church, decorating the church with flowers grown in her garden.

Also part of the church community is Hilary Kerr, whose grandfather, Edmund Shrubb, won the original tender to build the church.

The dainty little Anglican Church is extremely popular as a location for weddings, with a regular church service taking place on the first Sunday of each month.

"We are a mixed congregation. Everyone is welcome," said Mr Flick.

The church is part of a heritage-listed precinct of curtilage that includes the church, the community hall an the old school that sits on a parcel of land first gifted to the community by Thomas Ewing.

All this sits in the shade of a row of majestic fig trees first planted by students of the school on Arbour Day nearly 90 years ago.

The church contains many original features including the main stained glass window in the memory of William and Sarah Flick.

Topics:  centenary, church, ewingsdale


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