Entertainment

Day two of Splendour more subdued

Lana Del Rey
Lana Del Rey Blainey Woodham

IT APPEARED many were struck down with a case of Splendour in the Grass fatigue with a noticeable shortage of midday revellers on day two of the three day festival.

Another glorious day was promised for Saturday but this time it delivered, with nothing but blue skies and hip tunes to keep the sold out crowd in good spirits.

The Supertop was overflowing with punters keen to stay up late for British rockers Bloc Party.

Front man Kele Okereke greeted the crowd with a "g'day" before launching into hits Mercury and Hunting for Witches.

American "sadcore" singer Lana Del Rey was nearly drowned out by her throngs of adoring fans in the G

Backed by a string quartet and piano, she opened her show with Blue Jeans and wasted no time walking down to the front of the stage to serenade her dedicated fans.

"I had to come down and see my people," she said.

"I'm really grateful and I adore you."

Dressed in a white dress and short veil, Del Rey was pitch perfect but her show suffered from a few sound problems including a scratchy mic.

She worked her way through most of the tracks on her album Born to Die and sang a cover of Nirvana's Heart Shaped Box before closing her set with National Anthem.

Meanwhile at the Mix-Up Tent, Gossling joined 360 during his high energy set to sing their collaboration Boys Like You.

Gold Coast bad boys Bleeding Knees Club opened the day on the Supertop.

Their surf pop antics enticed three young girls on stage to sing the chorus of "Girls Can Do Anything".

Indie boy bands continued to be a running theme.

Dublin charmers The Cast of Cheers and energetic Brisbanian four-piece Last Dinosaurs played to swelling crowds at the Supertop.

The latter commenting it was their biggest audience to date.

The GW McLennan kicked off with local lads Lifeline followed by a quiet set of thoughtful indie pop from Mosman Alder.

Here We Go Magic were a tad gloomy, looking every inch the uber cool New York outfit.

Their trippy melodies were a soothing fix for any early afternoon tiredness with many cosying up on the ground.

The Mix Up tent was again party central with Tijuana Cartel carving it up with their global dance beats.

New-to-the-scene hipsters Friends injected a bit of an R&B vibe to their set of sexy tunes and the sultry lead singer flaunted a Smashing Pumpkins T-shirt given to her by a fan.

Away from the music, festivallers were getting hitched in random, debauched ceremonies inside the Tent of Miracles.

Proceedings were overseen by a celebrant dressed in white leather and a very questionable Priest.

Triple j presenters John Safran, Tom Ballard, Kram of Spiderbait and Kav Tamperley of Eskimo Joe discussed music and religion in the Forum tent.

Drumming troupe the Samba Blissta's leant their instruments to enthusiastic crowd members and North Coast talent continued to shine on the Busker Stage with Mick McHugh and Mojo Bluesman among the four acts of the day.

Given the torrential rain and hail late Friday afternoon Belongil Fields was one big mud pit.

It was reported gum boots were sold out on site and some even braved the trip into Byron Bay where they were being sold in the street.

Police seemed to up the ante with several manning Gate 2 from midday and first aid tents didn't appear to be overflowing with people; a good sign attendees are staying safe and enjoying themselves.

Today punters can look forward to sets by Metric, Triple j darlings The Rubens, Husky, Ball Park Music, Angus Stone, Wolfmother, Missy Higgins, Gossip and a festival-closing show by The Smashing Pumpkins.

Topics:  lana del rey, splendour in the grass


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