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Bus operates legally

Grafton mothers speak with Grafton Busways Depot manager Chris Webb out the front of the South Grafton depot on Friday morning about the crowded conditions on thier school buses. Photo Debrah Novak / The Daily Examiner
Grafton mothers speak with Grafton Busways Depot manager Chris Webb out the front of the South Grafton depot on Friday morning about the crowded conditions on thier school buses. Photo Debrah Novak / The Daily Examiner Debrah Novak

AFTER a week of complaints from parents the Busways Company finally agreed to change some of their routes in order to avoid overcrowding.

However Transport NSW tells us under the statewide carrying capacity laws, the school buses can have as many as 130 kids on board.

Earlier this month a report from the School Bus Safety Community Committee, recommended the State Government start paying for seat belts to be installed in school buses.

However events this week have demonstrated the extent of the problem facing the school transport sector.

As a Busways spokeswoman indicated, to even have the children seated would require fleets to be increased by one third.

"It is important to recognise that the bus is operating within its legal carrying capacity, as defined by the RMS regulations and Transport for NSW guidelines," said the spokeswomen.

Under current laws three children can share two adult seats and kids can stand in the aisle.

However Busways decided on Friday, despite being legally protected, the bus was too crowded.

Consequently they put another bus on the route.

"Busways have implemented a temporary additional afternoon bus to cater for the Dovedale students from Grafton Public School and will continue to monitor this service."


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